A recent review of multiple existing studies by the journal Alimentary Pharmacology and Therapeutics has found that increasing your coffee intake may help reduce your chances of developing alcohol-related cirrhosis. Researchers, led by Dr. Oliver Kennedy of Southampton University in the United Kingdom, analyzed 9 studies that examined the relationship between coffee consumption and the risk of cirrhosis.

More than 430,000 participants were part of the 9 studies. In 8 of 9 studies, researchers found increasing coffee consumption by two cups a day was “associated with a statistically significant reduction in the risk of cirrhosis. The risk of cirrhosis was lower at higher levels of coffee consumption.” For example, compared to no coffee, 1 cup per day was associated with a 22% lower risk of cirrhosis and 4 cups per day was associated with a 65% lower risk. Researchers believe there may be an upper limit beyond which there is no further benefit. More research is needed. As Dr. Oliver Kennedy explains, “We now need to conduct proper clinical trials, similar to those necessary for authorization of a new pharmaceutical product, so that doctors and health policy makers can make specific recommendations.”

Cirrhosis is a condition that deteriorates the liver, replacing healthy tissue with scar tissue with scar tissue that blocks blood flow. According to the National Institution of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases, the damaging condition can be fatal. Doctors have found that common causes for this liver disorder are chronic hepatitis infections, excessive alcohol consumption, immune diseases, obesity, and diabetes. Cirrhosis kills more than a million people every year worldwide.

Dr. Hillel Tobias, a liver specialist and chairman of the American Liver Foundation’s National Medical Advisory Committee, says the possible preventative effects of coffee are not new, citing a 2015 report that showed a potential link between coffee’s health benefits and cirrhosis prevention. Tobias continues, “the problem is that most professionals in the liver community find this hard to accept. The physiological and biochemical basis has not been established and some experimental evidence is needed. Right now, many of these studies are based on historical information provided by patients.”

While coffee may reduce the risk of cirrhosis, it will not completely counteract the harmful effects of excess alcohol consumption. It is important to keep in mind that the amount of alcohol-related liver damage varies from person to person. The best preventative measure people can take is to maintain healthy eating and drinking habits.

Quench can help you ensure your employees have healthy drinking habits at work. Quench’s thermal coffee brewers keep your coffee hot and fresh for hours. No more coffee sludge in the break room!

Also by providing an endless supply of cold, fresh filtered water with a Quench filtered water cooler will entice employees to drink water, instead of sugary carbonated drinks. Need carbonated water? We have carbonated water coolers, too!